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Helping Developers Master PowerBuilder Classic and .NET

Yakov Werde

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Top Stories by Yakov Werde

I recently migrated a Classic MDI application to .NET.  One of the nice features that helped me prepare my code for .NET deployment is the Unsupported Feature list that appears in a selectable view in the Output window.   That view gets populated following a build if the app has unsupported features.  The unsupported list is a very useful guide to locating and navigating to lines of code and property references that need your special attention.  Here's what it looks like: While working my way through the code I noted that some unsupported features are innocuous.  The PowerScript precompiler doesn't generate them into the C# code.  Their presence has no impact on the resulting application.  As a busy developer, with deadlines to meet, I'm tempted to not remove them from the code until I have some spare time. But it I don't the pesky output window keeps reminding me... (more)

Crazy Eights: Migrating a Legacy Application up to PowerBuilder 12 .NET

I grew up in a Brooklyn NY apartment building. As a young kid, one of my rainy day after-school pastimes was playing card games with the other kids in my building. One of the games we played was crazy eights. If you're curious about this simple card game, check out the Wikipedia description at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crazy_Eights Recently I was tasked with migrating a legacy application with distant roots in version 4, up to PowerBuilder 12 .NET. The trip over to version 12 Classic went fine with nary a hitch. The ride over to .NET was not too bumpy either. But then I start... (more)

Refactoring Corner: Partitioning DataWindow Technology

One of the main goals of PowerBuilder Classic application refactoring is to divide the code into logical partitions. Although you will likely not gain significant performance increases in exchange for your efforts, you will achieve two other highly significant gains. First, your logic will gain interoperability; you will have the ability to share application business and data logic with other applications developed in other .NET languages. (I say ability because you still need to make your method interfaces Common Type System compliant.) Second, your code maintenance activities w... (more)

RESTful Web Services: A Quick-Start How-to Guide - Part 1

Among PowerBuilder 12.5 .NET's new features comes the ability to use WCF to call RESTful web services. This article, the first in a two-part series, provides a PowerBuilder 12.5 .NET developer with the foundational knowledge and skills to rapidly get up and running building PowerBuilder RESTful Web Service clients. Along the way I'll share with you a few tips and workarounds. Introduction PowerBuilder 12.0 .NET provided the ability to call SOAP-based web services using Microsoft's .NET 3.5 WCF API. I encourage those of you not familiar with WCF and SOAP to view my PowerBuilder W... (more)

RESTful Web Services: A Quick-Start How-to Guide - Part 2

Part 2 of "RESTful Web Services: A Quick-Start How-To Guide" explores foundational issues in coding RESTful operations, including Basic Authentication and Exception handling. Along the way I'll share with you multiple real-world coding tips and workarounds. Introduction As a teenager, one of my favorite TV shows was "The Wild Wild West." The show's description goes like this, "... a 60 minute western action series on CBS that was like no other. Special Agents James West and Artemus Gordon were spies for President Ulysses S. Grant shortly after the civil war. In every other way, ... (more)